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Showing posts from June, 2024

There is always Plan B Misha Herwin

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  Over the years I’ve been posting here I’ve tended to write my blog very much at the last minute, this month has been the same only more so. Yesterday ran away with me and by the time I realised I was in danger of missing my slot I was too tired to think, yet alone write. Inspiration too was missing. When I’m stressed I find it almost impossible to be creative. However, there is always plan B, which is why I’ve modified a post from my own blog. Here’s hoping that’s okay. When life gives you lemons then make lemonade is very much where I am just now. I was busy planning the publishing schedule for “Friday Night at Rosa’s” starting with “Wedding Belles at Rosa’s,” the prequel to the series. My post went up on Monday during the Mslexia write-in hour, then Mike and I had lunch and went shopping to M&S. Supper was mushroom risotto, a favourite of his, then he watched the football and I went to do more work on my list of things to do before publication day. All these might see

The Song of North Mountain and Morgan Golladay

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Hi lovely   AE   readers, Dianne here. I run the publishing company Current Words Publishing, which is partner publishing company. In addition to doing partner publishing my company also founded and supports Old Scratch Press (OSP), a poetry/short form collective. In 2025 OSP and its members are going to open up more opportunities for people not in the collective to have a chance to have their work in poetry or short form published. Currently there are opportunities remaining this year through Current Words Publishing’s literary magazine INSTANT NOODLES . Recently Morgan Golladay, an author I have worked with many times, has recently won a few awards for both her fiction and her poetry,  and through OSP has just published her first book, THE SONG OF NORTH MOUNTAIN which she both wrote and illustrated.  I sat down to talk with her ( https://www.facebook.com/morgangolladayfineartist )  about her book and her work.   Current Words Publishing (CWP):  What inspired you to write "The

Everlasting Flowers? A concert for Francis Turner Palgrave 22.6.2024

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Anthologies are sickly things,’ wrote the historian Sir Francis Palgrave in 1851. ‘The splendid bouquet decays into unsavoury trash, and as trash is thrown away.’ The word ‘anthology’ is derived from Greek and means a collection of the flowers of verse. Ten years later his son, Francis Turner Palgrave, picked possibly the most famous bunch in the English language. Sir Francis died in the month that The Golden Treasury of the Best Songs and  Lyrical Poems in the English Language was published. In his life, from difficult beginnings -- possibly attributable to prejudice against his Jewish ancestry -- he had achieved eminence as Deputy Keeper of the Public Record Office and had played a key role in ensuring that the national archives were properly catalogued and stored. His son’s success may be thought of as storing lyric poetry in individuals’ heads and establishing a distinctive poetic tradition as part of our cultural heritage. Sir Francis's oldest son, Francis Turner Palgrave was

Happy National Crime Reading Month!

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 It's June which means it's National Crime Reading Month. Lots of events are planned across the country and you can find out more about them at  crimereading.com  I'm hosting a couple of events at West Barnes Library in Motspur Park. First up, we have a murder mystery to solve! There's been a murder in Motspur Park. Miles Whitehead, local businessman was found dead in a ditch next to the pathway that runs between the park and the cemetery. Can you follow the clues and find the killer? Then on Monday 17th June, at 7.30pm, Graham Bartlett and Biba Pearce are coming to West Barnes Library to tell us about their police procedural books. Graham is a retired chief superintendent of Sussex Police and used to be in charge of Brighton and Hove. It's £2 cash entry on the door and books will be available to buy and be signed by the authors. Please book your space either by contacting the library using the details below or click  here.  Graham will help to solve our murder myst

Creating a World (Cecilia Peartree)

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I've been meaning to write an alternate history novel for some time now, but I have been put off, quite rightly in many ways, by the amount of research I thought I would need to do for it. Somehow unravelling things that did happen in real life and taking everything in a new direction was more daunting than inventing something completely new from square one. The initial idea for this was sparked by a conversation I had with a friend some time ago, which started when, for some reason lost in the mists of time, she told me that Edward VII, before becoming king, had fondly imagined his older sister Princess Vicky would inherit the throne, and when someone told him it would be him instead, he burst into tears. I began to speculate on what might have happened to international relations if Princess Vicky had inherited the British throne as well as becoming the empress of Germany, and I had been turning over this idea in my mind ever since. My initial thoughts on the subject, which were b

The Life of a Mystic - I, Julian by Claire Gilbert - a review by Sarah Nicholson

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I will confess until very recently I knew very little about Mother Julian of Norwich, perhaps just enough to write on a hazelnut, I’m sure I could fit “all will be well” – her most famous saying - on one, if I wrote in really, really, tiny letters.   ·         I knew she lived a very long time ago – she was born in 1342. ·         I knew she lived in Norwich, in a cell beside a church, a bit like a nun. ·         I knew she wrote a book called “Revelations of Divine Love.” I picked up a copy in a charity shop once, but it just sits on my shelf gathering dust – one day I might read it. Actually it has the distinction of being the first book written by a woman in English, which is quite a feat. Now there is a fictional autobiography about her called I, Julian by Claire Gilbert, which brings this mystical woman to life. I never really enjoyed history at school but give me a historical novel to read and I lap up all the details. Especially when this is about a woman who writes, who

Reflections on The Short Story

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                                                  Reflections on The Short Story   The short story as a form has always been a passion of mine and last month saw the death of Alice Munro, one of the great short story writers of our time, at the age of 92. Munro was Canadian, won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2013, and is often compared to Chekhov. She produced a number of outstanding collections such as  Runaway (2004),  Dear Life (2012) and  Lives of Girls and Women (1971), a group of linked stories which is considered by some to be an attempt at a novel; something that her publishers were always keen for her to do but which she resisted.   The short story as composed by Munro and a number of other writers such as Anton Chekhov, Katherine Mansfield, A.E. Coppard and more recently, William Trevor, is a form in literature all of its own, like an elegy or an ode in poetry. When I first went began as an adult educator at Greyfriars in Colchester in the 1990, I crafted a number of shor